Undergraduate and graduate programmes offered by the University iuav of Venice:

Vesper | Archive

 

 

Vesper No. 1 Supervenice

Fall-Winter 2019

 

contents

Click on ‘contents’ to access the abstracts and the contribution in open access

 

Quodlibet

 

download the issue in open access >>

 

ISSN 2704-7598

ISBN 978-88-229-0416-4

DOI 10.1400/283005

cover picture: Armin Linke, M.O.S.E. – Consorzio Venezia Nuova, ship maneuvering simulator, Venezia, 2007

 

Venice is well-known, its identity is so familiar to be considered obvious, summarized as if it were a replicable logo: the city shows its face leaving behind its backbone. Here gold and mud blend together, moulding a multifaceted document. In Venice an endless interchange between real and imaginary, original and fake, tiny and huge, powerful and fragile endures, while we look at the city as a shimmering object.

The alter ego of what is well-known and obvious becomes superlative, since it exceeds predetermined standards; furthermore, it represents the inconceivable condensed in the prefix of another language as it is revealed only when one leaves the city and looks at it from above. Suddenly actions, projects, works and methods arise from its established image moving the city towards another dimension, transfiguring it. This (super) slow wind blows through Venice but does not change it: Venice continues to offer its well-known face to the mirror that every day reflects it. Challenging that wind to go deeply inside the object, means diving into the detours and contradictions of Supervenice, at least for the time of a story on paper. Venice is constantly designed and painstakingly ‘preserved’, fortuitously born in a hostile land that denies any rules of contemporary sustainability; since its foundation Venice has been built on desires and fears. The city faces the remains of the largest industrial area in Europe. A bibliographic hypertrophy lays against the material trace of 20th century modernity: a gigantic ideal library has been created by measuring the most erratic and moody city of the Western World. Even if Marco Polo found Venice boring – so boring he did not want to return from his long journey –, its stability depends on the Sirocco and the moon, like in an Oriental environment. This primordial indeterminacy makes Venice a valuable laboratory – that would not be possible elsewhere – to reflect upon critical issues for up-coming future. The context changes and, with it, certainty wavers. This is the time to reopen the paths of research and project: Supervenice digs into an all too well-known territory in order to extract its anachronical genealogies. The super alter ego of Venice is a giant bubble that suspends Time while Space wavers: what remains is the space of project.

 

 

 

 

Vesper No. 2 Author-Matter

Spring-Summer 2020

 

contents

Click on ‘contents’ to access the abstracts and the contribution in open access

 

Quodlibet

 

download the issue in open access >>

 

ISSN 2704-7598

ISBN 978-88-229-0478-2

DOI 10.1400/283006

 

cover picture: Olivo Barbieri,

site specific_LAS VEGAS 07, 2007

 

The etymology of the word author refers to an act of creation, an act of augmentation, from the Latin verb augere. Author instantiates creation, the expansion of the pre-existing. In 1967 Roland Barthes declared the death of the author in his famous essay to state once more that the crisis is that of the author as a single subjectivity and as a term that condenses prestige, undermined by the de-subjectivation strategies of automatism, fortuity and fragmentation of the historical avant-gardes, as well as by the machinic act and by the reproducibility of the second avant-gardes.

Fifty years after Barthes’ paradigmatic formula, this lack of authorship appears to be a successful brand. The tensions between the anomie of matter, the law that establishes authorship and the economy that makes the work possible, invoke discordant perspectives. Artists make the self-destruction of their work the real work, and appeal is made for the demolition of architectures, whether by a recognised author or not, in order to re-design, or better still, re-claim the territory. Artificial intelligence consolidates its logics and its design by progressively shedding human ingenuity. The space of criticism becomes, finally, increasingly ephemeral. However, there is an acceptation of criticism that is, rather than an individual ‘signature’, an exploration and explanation of how design makes theory.

The binomial author-matter seeks to mark these tensions and contradictions: the featured term author is maintained to underline the persistence of that prestigious subjectivity, at the very moment when the rhetoric of “matter as an author” promises other forms of authorship.

 

 

 

 

Vesper No. 3 Wildness

Fall-Winter 2020

 

contents

Click on ‘contents’ to access the abstracts and the contribution in open access

 

Quodlibet

 

download the issue in open access >>

 

ISSN 2704-7598

ISBN 978-88-229-0533-8

DOI 10.1400/283007

 

cover picture: Guido Guidi, Sardegna_Orani 07-2011

 

The sylva returns both as an image, capable of distilling the character of places and the modalities of crossing them, and a reality: forests are advancing in some territories, and the concrete presence of wild and untamed areas within cities is a constantly expanding fact. The two levels of reading of the sylva – the one taking it as a figuration through which to interpret reality and the other analysing it as actual space – require a codification of the tools and modes of inhabiting such an unknown locus.

The return of the sylvan marks the return of a new sense of the ‘archaic’, of yet another mixture of architecture and earth, a conscious combination of the conflict between the reason and the uncanny, adventure and comfort, memories of the city and sylvan ways of life. The term selva denotes precise and concrete realities and multiple imaginaries but also indicates the possible trajectory of future time as well as the turning towards a very distant past: it is an arrow whose direction establishes the connotations of a possible new contrat naturel.

 

 

 

 

Vesper No. 4 Exiles and Exoduses

Spring-Summer 2021

 

contents

Click on ‘contents’ to access the abstracts

 

Quodlibet

 

ISSN 2704-7598

ISBN 978-88-229-0635-9

 

cover picture: Stefano Graziani, Ceruleo che varia dal blu profondo fino all’azzurro, quasi sempre passando attraverso tonalitā di verde, Trieste, 2013

 

Two movements, perhaps antithetical, affect space. Individuals exclude themselves, exit (exilium, exsul, ex-solum), come out of their own land, withdraw into another circumstance, depose power from within, shun the power that withholds. Exile can be an individual choice, but it can also be a constraint that involves, cumulatively, a large number. At the same time, peoples, animals, and plants are in exodus, moving, fleeing, migrating, changing the design and the sense of territory and geographies.

Three figures take shape from these movements: the space of the journey and the traces of the crossing, the destination or just the place of arrival, and finally the image of the house, of the city, or of the abandoned ‘homeland’. These figures unite the two movements: certainly in exile the journey can be instantaneous; it can last as long as it takes to make a decision, to refuse, to write a text, to close a door. During the exodus, by contrast, the journey can prove to be the destination itself – in flight one may have to stop from necessity, by force, or by choice.

Exiles and exoduses sediment themselves in history, sometimes finding space in the chronicle with novel accents. While the need for a gaze from the optimal distance is reiterated, the stones of other cities are silently laid, and the blending inheritance is renewed. The two movements perhaps tell us stories of new and repeating geneses.

 

 

 

 

Vesper No. 5 Moby Dick: Adventures and Discoveries

Fall-Winter 2021

 

contents

Click on ‘contents’ to access the abstracts

 

Quodlibet

 

ISSN 2704-7598

ISBN 978-88-229-0714-1

 

 

 

cover picture: Alberto Sinigaglia, Untitled, 2010

 

Melville’s narrative is mentioned to suggest, recall, and emphasise ‘frontier research’, meant as a mode of investigation literally positioned at the extremes of knowledge, at the edge of what is known. The task of any research is to go beyond the already known, the already given. Beyond the mainstream, however, working at the edges means tackling controversial issues, which are difficult to settle with established methodologies: it calls for the ‘move of the knight’. In other words, it requires experimentation even in practice. More than that, frontier research is aimed at refuting dominant paradigms, thereby working with a high degree of uncertainty and failure.

 

 

 

contacts

t +39 041 257 1542

pard.iride@iuav.it

 

infrastruttura.iride@iuav.it